Categories
Underground gallery shows

8,817 Goodbyes and Theater of War by Meredith Davenport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APRIL 17 6pm Gallery opening!

Meredith Davenport earned her MFA from Hunter College and her BFA from Rochester Institute of Technology. She has a distinguished career in documentary photography. Her photographs have appeared in National Geographic, The New York Times and on the cover of Newsweek magazine. She was a location producer and videographer in the highly acclaimed HBO documentary “Child Soldiers”. 

She was invited to do a fellowship at Yaddo. She has received a Pew Fellowship and a Puffin Foundation grant. Her work has been exhibited in New York at the International Center of Photography. Her book “Theater of War” is published by Intellect Press and is distributed by the University of Chicago Press. She is an Associate Professor of Photography at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

Categories
Underground gallery shows

North Troy Peoples' History Museum

PLEASE NOTE: Call 518-272-2390 if you’d like to set up a special appointment, or email: [email protected]

 

 Sponsored by NATURE Lab (North Troy Art, Technology,and Urban Research in Ecology) at The Sanctuary for Independent Media.

 

 

 

 

 

The inspiration for this site-specific museum is digital folk artist and journalist Brenda Ann Kenneally’s decade long, transmedia documentary, Upstate Girls: Unraveling Collar City. Kenneally’s connection to the North Troy Community that she documents is sustained by the core belief that telling one’s own story in a deeply personal way can be the strongest political action an individual can take. This intersection of personal and political will set the tone for the partnership between Kenneally, The Sanctuary For Independent Media, and the North Troy Neighbors that have become active participants in the preservation of their own histories.

The goal of this museum is to perpetuate and preserve the creation of a rich and detailed platform for engagement with its North Troy Neighborhood. The museum itself will be housed in a building that appears in The Upstate Girl’s Documentary as it is the former home of a family that Kenneally chronicled. The story of the building itself will serve as a bullet point ( see timeline below) for 2008. The family who lived there was forced to leave after a series of bank and real estate missteps, that were set in motion by the financial crumble in 2008. The building stayed vacant and fell into disrepair until it was acquired by The Sanctuary For Independent Media in 2014, to be repurposed as a community art space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since 2004, Kenneally has made still photographs, filmed videos, lead participatory scrapbooks workshops, and collected ephemera from an extended family of young people as they have come of age on one block in North Troy, New York. Troy’s rich history as a prototype for the Industrialization of America became an integral character in the work in 2008 when Kenneally began researching and collecting historic photographs, texts, ephemera and scrapbooks from The Rennslear County Historical Society. Kenneally’s obsession with contextualizing the stories of the young people who she has documented and situating these stories alongside those of their Victorian counterparts will lead to an invaluable legacy of American Post- Industrial Culture.

 

The Key elements of this hyper-local collection are:

  • A historic timeline mural to run along the bottom half of the walls. The timeline will date back to the Paleo Indian’s (Hudson Valley’s first inhabitants) and will be a constant work in progress that will reflect the most recent events to affect the community. The timeline will include landmark events in industry, government, and economic, social, and environmental policy. These major milestones will carry equal weight with macro event like births and deaths of current residents. It is meant to demonstrate the relationship between progress and the evolution of public attitudes and policies policy and the changing significance of the individual. The timeline is to be vetted by historian Kathy Sheehan of The Rennslaer County Historical Society.
  • A memorial collection of newspaper articles and television clips documenting youth whose lives were lost too early in North Troy- community is encouraged to bring and share personal photos – cell phone – face book pages ect. There will be a guest book to share memories as well.

  • A video room to project a repository of videos made by neighborhood filmmakers- subjects include; youth media documentaries, videos of community events and Kenneally’s own interactive documentary that uses a Troy specific collection of keywords to allow the viewer to navigate through clips. Many of the keywords are reflected in the timeline and lead the viewer to make connections between the past and present.
  • Large scale prints of Contemporary and Victorian Scrapbooks and two monitors with heads sets view narrated multimedia.

  • A display of historic photos, postcards and neighborhood maps- including local directories of residents of the neighborhood in the early 1900’s

  • A 4 x6 snapshot wall and a monitor to display donations of cell phone pictures on a loop– this will be updated regularly and after a period of time become archived as part of the collection and started a new- likely this could occur annually.
  • Five Transmedia Books made by Kenneally in partnership with Rochester Institute of Technology. The books document the coming of age of young people in The North Troy Community between the years 2004- 2014. Books will have video stills to drive the narrative and are interactive with Kenneally’s video. Book Three is an integrated History of Collar City- Troy’s nickname during its heyday as a leading textile manufacturer.
  • Ongoing Portrait series of current residents of North troy hung alongside portraits of Key local historical figures. The contemporary series began as a free holiday portrait event at The Sanctuary For Independent Media in 2012. The participants were presented with digital files of their studio portraits and those who agreed had their images become part of a growing archive of portraits of our North Troy Neighborhood. Through a donation of equipment we are able to make this an annual event. This even will also serve as an opportunity for the community to engage with the museum and make additions to the collection by donating personal pieces of history of remembrances to the memorial.
  • StoryCandles was created by Brenda Kenneally, co-produced by Kathryn Draper with additional support from Stacey Draper and others at the Rensselaer County Historical Society, is a 16-foot cargo trailer transformed into a participatory travelling installation to honor the children from Breathing Lights’ communities whose lives have ended too soon. The “memory bank” is a collection of words, pictures and audio reflections culled from these communities to form an open-ended collage to keep the stories of these young people alive. Many thanks to the dedicated artists and research librarians who made this installation possible.

                                    

First exhibit of North Troy Peoples’ History Museum: 9/30 – 12/17 . By appointment. Visit www.mediasanctuary.org for reservations.

A concerted effort will be made to position this museum, not as an ephemeral work of art, but as a living history and as such, out reach to teachers, activists, and those who engage with youth via the therapeutic and justice systems will be vigorous.

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More about Brenda Ann Kenneally:

Brenda Ann Kenneally is a Guggenheim and Soros Criminal Justice Media Fellow. She attended the University of Miami, where she earned a B.S. in sociology and photojournalism, and New York University, where she received an M.A. in studio art. Kenneally has focused on how families get lost in a culture of drugs and prison. She searches for ways to motivate inner-city women to empower themselves, despite their limited social and economic opportunities. Kenneally’s work has been featured in the New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, and Ms. Magazine, among other publications. In 2000, she won the Community Awareness Award from the National Press Photographer’s Association, and in 2001 she was awarded the International Prize for Photojournalism in Gijon, Spain. Kenneally’s work in Brooklyn has received support from the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund, the Mother Jones Documentary Fund, and the Nikon Sabbatical Grant, in addition to the Open Society Institute. Kenneally has worked with us exhibiting her photos, teaching photojournalism workshops, and curating several exhibitions.

Learn more about Brenda Ann Kenneally at her website: 

http://www.therawfile.org

Categories
Underground gallery shows

What Is Seeing?

The Raft by the Seeing With Photography CollectiveThe Seeing with Photography Collective is a group of photographers based in New York City who are visually impaired, sighted and blind.

They follow a unique process to create their work:

Sighted assistants focus and compose the camera’s frame, directed by the blind artist. Then, in a darkened room, they leave the camera’s shutter open and slowly paint their sitter with a small flashlight. Luminous distortions and blurred or glowing forms result from the technique, not digital altering.

The nature of the artists’ visual limitations can provoke any viewer or perceiver of these portraits: Is less, more? What is seeing? What does one choose to see?

The Seeing with Photography Collective’s work has been exhibited worldwide and can be seen in the book Shooting Blind, published by Aperture.

Don’t miss their afternoon Be The Media! workshop and evening in-person presentation with the Daniel Kelly Trio at the gallery opening on Saturday, May 9.

Categories
Underground gallery shows

"Dear Climate" Art Opening, A Conversation with Marina Zurkow and Oliver Kellhammer

Join Dear Climate artists Marina Zurkow and Oliver Kellhammer in conversation about climate change. Learn strategies to “Befriend Climate Change,” from international environmental crises to hyper-local challenges such as brownfields, decaying urban neighborhoods, and toxic blight right here in North Troy and the Capital Region!



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is Dear Climate? Just a conceptual nudge (not a paradigm shift). The old joke—“Everyone talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it”—isn’t so funny anymore. Lots of people are trying to do something about the weather. Climate change is on the geopolitical agenda, if only in time for us to realize that it’s too late to do anything meaningful. Maybe the problem’s not that no one’s been doing anything about the weather, but that we’ve been talking about it in the wrong way: the old “let’s fix it” way. Now that the weather’s changed, is it also time to change the way we talk about it?

To craft new kinds of personal engagement with climate change, we charted three “movements of mind.” The first, “Meet Climate Change,” was about openness and encounter, acquaintance and curiosity. Observation and conversation were obvious techniques for this, but so were certain “techniques of consciousness,” like meditation and mindfulness, that seemed to us to be imbued with a spirit of deep friendliness, which led to our second movement: “Befriend Climate Change.” Once you invite someone or something into your mental home, it’s only a matter of time before you get to know it better. The imagination gets seriously involved, the conversation deepens, the plot thickens.


Our third movement was “Become Climate Change.” Taking up the challenge of the new weather means we have to understand our human selves in ways beyond biography, even beyond history. We have to understand our species as a geophysical force that is shaping the systems of our planet. Performing that conceptual feat will require many kinds of imagination, not just the imagination of crisis and catastrophe. It will mean not just doing something about the weather, but talking about it—and feeling about it—differently.

Sponsored by NATURE Lab, Rensselaer’s School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, iEAR Presents, NYSCA, and NEA. 

MORE ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Marina Zurkow is a media artist with a focus on humans’ relationships to animals, plants and the weather. These take the form of multi-channel videos, customized multi-screen computer pieces, animated cartoons, participatory works, and pop objects. Zurkow is represented by Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York; since 2000, she has exhibited at The Sundance Film Festival, The Rotterdam Film Festival, Res Fest, Ars Electronica, Creative Time, The Kitchen, The Walker Art Center, the Brooklyn Museum, The National Museum for Women in the Arts, and Eyebeam, among other venues. Her videos have been broadcast on MTV, FujiTV and PBS. She is a 2005 NYFA Fellow, a 2003 Rockefeller New Media Fellow, and a 2001 Creative Capital grantee. She teaches at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP), and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Oliver Kellhammer is a Canadian land artist, permaculture teacher, activist and writer. Through his botanical interventions and public art projects, he seeks to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His work facilitates the processes of environmental regeneration by engaging the botanical and socio-political underpinnings of the landscape. It continues to evolve and has taken various forms such as small-scale urban eco-forestry, inner city community agriculture and the restoration of eroded railway ravines. Contact: okellhammer[at]gmail.com | twitter =>okellhammer

Hi res photos:   http://www.dearclimate.net/img/pdfs/54.pdf 

 

Categories
Underground gallery shows

Ecological Interventions Art Opening/ NATURE Lab Opening!

"Guerrilla Grafting," Oliver Kellhammer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ballengée, Skate, Hudson River Valley project   Kellhammer, Crowngraft, Guerilla Grafting

“Ecological Interventions” features two internationally renowned environmental artists who care deeply about out ecology and our future, Brandon Ballengée (US) and Oliver Kellhammer (Canada). Their projects explore how we as citizens of the world can change our environmental impact.

Curated by Kathy High. With support from NYSCA REDC, NEA “BioArt in an Industrial Wasteland,” NY State Museum Ichthyology Lab and the Arts Department, School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences at Rensselaer. 

Kellhammer and Ballengée have a mission to help us all learn how to interact with our environments, and look for signs of damage to aid in the repair that is necessary.  Both artists are determined to teach citizens to become scientific investigators able to change their local eco-system. This exhibition shows photographic evidence of their experiments and explorations.

 

Ballangée, Mudpuppy, Necturus maculosus, 2001/03, Hudson River Valley project

Ballangée has been working with aquatic systems, rivers, streams, swamps, to look at the biodiversity of our waterways and how to repair and deal with pollutants.  One block from the Hudson River, photographs hang on the upstairs wall of the Underground Gallery, from his project “Breathing Space for the Hudson: Charting the Biodiversity and Pollutants of the Hudson River.” 

Ballengée, Striped Kilifish, Fundulus Majalis, Hudson River Valley project

On June 7-8, Ballengée comes to Troy to conduct participatory workshops and speak about his aquatic ecological art project “BreathingSpace for the Hudson: Charting the Biodiversity and Pollutants of the Hudson River” and more. Ballengee will return to conduct a participatory workshop summer 2014 to
collect aquatic specimens of North Troy Hudson area and to analyze them.

Cleared and Stained Atlantic Sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrhynchus, 2001/03      

 

GuOliver Kellhammer is a land artist, social sculptor and permaculturist who has worked over years to plant the earth with remediating vegetation.

Healing the Cut – Bridging the Gap is a response to  several new bridges across the Cut, a man-made ravine originally excavated in 1910 to accommodate a railway. The bridge construction was controversial because it destroyed lush, deciduous forest which provided important habitat for urban wildlife as well as a visual reprieve from the heavily urbanized landscape. Brandon BallengéeThe project re-imagines the bridge as a community viewing platform to observe the processes of ecological restoration.  We restored the ravine’s forest using hundreds of willow and cottonwood cuttings, which root and stabilize the soil until the original alder and big-leaf maple forest re-establish itself. The advantage of these living, ‘bioengineered’ structures is that they are ‘intelligent’ and adjust themselves to changing conditions. We installed nest boxes to bring back displaced birds: their droppings ensure continuous ‘seed-rain’ of native plant species and furnish important plant nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. 

Guerilla Grafting   I have been performing various ‘botanical re-mixing’ experiments, investigating the capacity of native and naturalized plants to serve as  ‘scaffolding’ for related species that offer higher food yields, “hyperorganisms” which are assemblages of two or more species that form a living system with characteristics of all the component parts. For example, I have grafted Bartlett Pear to wild hawthorn, which creates a hyperorganism with its own, built-in barbed wire fence which protects the delicious fruit from roving deer.

Neo Eocene  If global warming threatens to bring back the Eocene’s temperatures (from some 55 million years ago), why not reintroduce the Eocene’s trees?  That’s where we come in. Over the past dozen or so years, I have been introducing into my yard some tree species that once made up the Eocene forests of British Columbia and have been tracking their progress.

 

More about the artists:

 
Brandon Ballengée
is a visual artist, biologist and environmental activist based in New York. He creates interdisciplinary artworks inspired from his ecological field and laboratory research. Since 1996, a central investigation focus has been looking at developmental deformities and population declines among amphibians.

"Mutant Frog," Brandon Ballengée

 

Since 1996, his transdisciplinary practice has bridged primary scientific studies with ecological art and engaged environmental stewardship. Inherent to this working method
is an impetus for “ecosystem activism” implemented through participatory biology field investigations and laboratory programs that stress public involvement – his attempt at
social sculpting. His artworks come from direct experiences with amphibians, birds, fish and insect species found in today’s preternatural ecosystems and those observed in post-natural laboratory settings. The art itself is made from diverse mediums including biological materials (chemically cleared and stained deformed specimens displayed as glowing gems, preserved specimens to represent collapsing global food webs, living plants and animals displaced in temporary mesocosums, paintings from his own blood mixed with industrial pollutants found in my own body and the living bodies of all organisms), large-scale scanner photographs representing the individuality of non-human individuals, outdoor light sculptures to encourage insect fornication and participatory trans-species happenings- all of these try to re-examine the context of the art object from a static form (implying rationality and control) into a more organic structure reflecting the inherent chaos found within evolutionary processes, biological systems and nature herself.

Oliver Kellhammer is a land artist and botanist, permaculture teacher, activist and writer. Through his botanical interventions and public art projects, he seeks to demonstrate nature’s
surprising ability to recover from damage. His work facilitates the processes of environmental regeneration by engaging the botanical and socio-political underpinnings of the landscape. It continues to evolve and has taken various forms such as small-scale urban eco-forestry, inner city community agriculture and the restoration of eroded railway ravines.

Soon it would be too hot. Looking out from the hotel balcony shortly after eight o’clock, Kerans watched the sun rise behind the dense groves of giant gymnosperms crowding through the roofs of the abandoned department stores four hundred yards away on the east side of the lagoon. Even through the massive olive-green fronds the relentless power of the sun was plainly tangible. —J.G Ballard, The Drowned World (1962)

Categories
Underground gallery shows

"Kids Farm Photography"

The Spring ’13 Underground Gallery exhibit at the Sanctuary is a partnership of Agricultural Stewardship Association, Soul Fire Farm and Capital District Community Garden.

MORE ABOUT THE PARTNERS

Agricultural Stewardship Association (ASA) is a non-profit, community-supported land trust founded by local farmers and citizens to strengthen the region’s vitally important agricultural economy and save farmland in Washington and Rensselaer counties from development. Since 1990, when it started as an all-volunteer organization, ASA has grown into a nationally respected, professionally staffed land trust that has helped to save nearly 15,000 acres of farm and forestland. ASA is accredited by the Land Trust Alliance — a distinction awarded only to groups that adhere to the highest professional land trust standards and practices.

Agricultural Stewardship Association mission is to protect our community’s working landscape of farms and forests, connect people to the land, and promote a vibrant future for agriculture in the region.

Capital District Community Garden’s “Produce Project” is an urban farm which offers stipends, school credit and a harvest share to youth from Troy High School in exchange for tending crops and selling them to local markets and restaurants. Last fall, the youth had the opportunity to take photography classes on their farm and Soul Fire Farm in Grafton. Their images in this exhibit are the fruits of their labor and creativity!

Categories
Underground gallery shows

"Planting Seeds: Four Lenses on North Troy"

On one city block — home to the Sanctuary, Collard City Growers, Missing Link Street Ministry and Troy Bike Rescue — communities are combining resources to address the environmental, social and public health challenges of the residents of North Troy.  This exhibition will feature local photojournalists Patrick Dodson, Brian Jones, Brenda Ann Kenneally, and Ellie Markovitch.

Brian Jones is a recent graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  He graduated 2011 with a degree in Electronic Media, Arts, and Communication.  The Sanctuary for Independent Media has shown him how art can tell a story.  More information on an exhibit at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute that Jones took part in can be found here.

 

Patrick Dodson followed the activities of Uptown Summer ’12, photographing and blogging documentation of Youth Media Sanctuary as they created cooking videos in the Sanctuary kitchen and the neighboring Collard City Grower’s garden, dedicated to the theme of nutrition on a budget.  His work can be found here.

“Troy’s Native Son” displays the work of Brenda Ann Kenneally. She has spent more than eight years documenting the life of Donny, a young boy from the neighborhood who has been plagued by emotional and behavioral disabilities. Kenneally investigates the complicated social systems that contributed to Donny’s problems and the solutions that have started to help him get better.  Her work was the subject of a Time Light Box article.  

“Art and Nutrition in North Troy,” with photos by Ellie Markovitch and Patrick Harris, documents creative activities, including StoryHarvest, DIY Snack-Shops, the Mind Body Soul Carnival, and Uptown Summer, to bring focus to food justice, urban gardening, alternative transportation and grassroots media for community education.  She keeps a blog with recipes and pictures.

 

 

 

Categories
Underground gallery shows

Kids, Farm, Photography

The Spring ’13 Underground Gallery exhibit at the Sanctuary is a partnership of Agricultural Stewardship Association, Soul Fire Farm and Capital District Community Garden.

MORE ABOUT THE PARTNERS

Agricultural Stewardship Association (ASA) is a non-profit, community-supported land trust founded by local farmers and citizens to strengthen the region’s vitally important agricultural economy and save farmland in Washington and Rensselaer counties from development. Since 1990, when it started as an all-volunteer organization, ASA has grown into a nationally respected, professionally staffed land trust that has helped to save nearly 15,000 acres of farm and forestland. ASA is accredited by the Land Trust Alliance — a distinction awarded only to groups that adhere to the highest professional land trust standards and practices.

Agricultural Stewardship Association mission is to protect our community’s working landscape of farms and forests, connect people to the land, and promote a vibrant future for agriculture in the region.

Capital District Community Garden’s “Produce Project” is an urban farm which offers stipends, school credit and a harvest share to youth from Troy High School in exchange for tending crops and selling them to local markets and restaurants. Last fall, the youth had the opportunity to take photography classes on their farm and Soul Fire Farm in Grafton. Their images in this exhibit are the fruits of their labor and creativity!

Categories
Underground gallery shows

Facing Change: Documenting America

Facing Change logoJust as the Farm Security Administration sent photographers to cover the Great Depression, a collective called Facing Change: Documenting America has enlisted artists—including two Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers—to record America’s current struggles.  An exhibition of their work opened on Friday, March 2, 2012 and ran through Saturday, June 16, 2012 in the Underground Gallery at The Sanctuary for Independent Media.  

You can read about Facing Change: Documenting America in this Washington Post article.

"New York, NY: May 2, 2011" by Alan ChinThe exhibit was open to the public free of charge from 11 AM-1 PM on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, as well as an hour before, during and an hour after events at The Sanctuary for Independent Media and by special arrangement. 

"Too Young To Die" by Carlos Javier OrtizOn Saturday, March 3 from 12-4 PM, Facing Change photographers Alan Chin, Brenda Ann Kenneally and Andrew Lichtenstein led a seminar at The Sanctuary for Independent Media as part of the Be The Media! workshop series.  Participants learned how to use their cameras to raise social awareness, expand public debate, and frame critical issues, working with experienced photojournalists who have dedicated their lives to the belief that the personal is always political.  

"Pine Ridge Reservation" by Danny Wilcox FrazierAt 5 PM on Saturday, March 3, there was a free gallery walk-through with Facing Change photographers Brenda Ann Kenneally, Alan Chin and Andrew Lichtenstein, followed by a community potluck.  

Facing Change: Documenting America is a non-profit collective of writers and photojournalists dedicated to covering the vast array of challenges facing Americans. Founded in 2009 by Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers Lucian Perkins, formerly a photographer for the Washington Post, and Anthony Suau, formerly a contract photographer for Time magazine, FCDA aims to pay tribute to and continue the work started by the Depression-era photojournalists. FCDA has just announced a partnership with the Library of Congress to archive and publish these new photographs.

"Leo fishing, Mississippi" by Debbie Fleming CafferyAt a time when America faces enormous challenges, FCDA is sending photographers to communities across America to vividly illustrate the nation’s most pressing concerns-from health care to immigration to the cost of the war on terror. The results are an unparalleled collection of visual narratives accessible through an innovative online platform–called the Public Sphere–enabling direct dialogue with America on stories and issues. FCDA images are distributed via an active and searchable archive, called PhotoShelter,  to newspapers and magazines worldwide.

"St. Joseph's House" by Lucian PerkinsAs media outlets yield to corporate considerations, they have narrowed their coverage of vital issues. FCDA is filling that gap by humanizing a wide spectrum of neglected and misunderstood issues. For example, one team will follow veterans as they reintegrate into civilian life. Another will explore the current economic crisis and the decades-long downturn in the Rust Belt. Others will focus on forgotten corners like Hereford, Texas; Fayette, Mississippi, and Allen, South Dakota-places that rarely draw the nation’s attention.

"The Redneck Riviera" by Stanley GreenTo highlight these issues, FCDA has created an online “Public Sphere”, an interactive platform that hosts stories, images and multi-media pieces created by the teams. These stories are searchable through a series of issue-related US maps linking the public to FCDA photographers and writers, community nonprofits and individuals via active blogs, and comments sections. Fostering dialogue, the Public Sphere will empower communities and individuals to suggest story ideas as well as connect, and initiate solutions.

"Hether" by Brenda Ann KenneallyAs the communications director at Detroit’s Gleaners Community Food Bank Anne Schenk recently stated:

“Many nonprofits lack the experience and resources to effectively communicate the value and impact of their work. I believe that Facing Change: Documenting America can provide an invaluable service to nonprofits.”

Drawing on the collective’s extensive network of media contacts, FCDA’s images, stories, and multimedia pieces are searchable online for use in both traditional and new media. In the future the Public Sphere will be expanded in the form of interactive installations traveling to towns and cities throughout the nation to reach audiences beyond the internet. The archive will reside at the Library of Congress.

Inspired by the Farm Security Administration photography project of the Great Depression FCDA is comprised of some of the country’s most accomplished photographers and writers. Facing Change: Documenting America is currently making a powerful contribution to the journalism landscape, giving a voice to new perspectives and influencing public discourse. Initially planned for four years, the project has the potential to be continued for years to come.

 

Categories
Underground gallery shows

Connecting with the Land

Connecting with the Land is a photography exhibit that lets us experience local farms through the eyes of youth. The photos were taken during photography classes at farms in Rensselaer and Washington counties. The Farm Photography for Kids is a program by the Agricultural Stewardship Association (ASA) a community-supported land trust dedicated to protecting our local farmland from encroaching development. 

The exhibit also features work by Produce Project urban farm youth from Troy High School. Students documented the 8th street farm in Troy and Soul Fire Farm in Grafton. Produce Project is a program by Capital District Community Garden.

MORE ABOUT THE PARTNERS

The Spring ’13 Underground Gallery exhibit is a partnership of Agricultural Stewardship Association, Soul Fire Farm, Capital District Community Garden and KitchenSanctuary.

Agricultural Stewardship Association (ASA) is a non-profit, community-supported land trust founded by local farmers and citizens to strengthen the region’s vitally important agricultural economy and save farmland in Washington and Rensselaer counties from development. Since 1990, when it started as an all-volunteer organization, ASA has grown into a nationally respected, professionally staffed land trust that has helped to save nearly 15,000 acres of farm and forestland. ASA is accredited by the Land Trust Alliance — a distinction awarded only to groups that adhere to the highest professional land trust standards and practices. Agricultural Stewardship Association mission is to protect our community’s working landscape of farms and forests, connect people to the land, and promote a vibrant future for agriculture in the region.

 

Capital District Community Garden’s “Produce Project” is an urban farm which offers stipends, school credit and a harvest share to youth from Troy High School in exchange for tending crops and selling them to local markets and restaurants. Last fall, the youth had the opportunity to take photography classes on their farm and Soul Fire Farm in Grafton. Their images in this exhibit are the fruits of their labor and creativity!

Categories
Underground gallery shows

Media Nodes

At a time when hard-core, investigative journalism is in peril, the Sanctuary’s Underground Gallery presents “Media Nodes,” a view behind the curtain, beyond the front page, to the interior landscape of a news industry in transition.

Award-winning photographer Sean Hemmerle, in collaboration with the Columbia Journalism Review, took his camera into newsrooms around the country.  “People throw around this word all the time, mostly disparangingly: ‘oh, the media,’ and ‘media spin,” he says.  “That made me think: who is the media?  And what about the media?  I wanted to put a face on these media nodes, the places where news is ‘made.'”

10/16/11 – 12/3/11; Mon, Tue, (closed Wed), Thu, Fri, 11 AM-1 PM; an hour before, during and an hour after events; plus by appointment.

BIO

Sean Hemmerle is an award-winning New York based photographer specializing in architectural and urban landscape photography. 

His work has been widely exhibited, including The Museum of Modern Art in New York; The Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, The Houston Museum of Fine ARt, The Pingyao Photography Festival in Pingyao, China, and many other solo exhibitions.  His photography has graced the covers and pages of many magazines including TIME, Metropolis, WIRED, Interior Design, New York Magazine, The New York Times, and The Columbia Journalism Review.  A regular contributor to Time, New York, and Metropolis magazines, he has been affiliated with Contact Press Images since 2001.

Hemmerle was born in 1966 in Tempe, Arizona, USA. After serving in the U.S. Army (1984-1988), and earned an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York in 1997. Since 9/11, Hemmerle has turned his eye toward documenting the effects of war in New York, Afghanistan and Iraq. In 2002, he turned his camera’s eye to Media Nodes, in collaboration with the Columbia Journalism Review.

Sean’s grandfather was a newsman, and my father was a cameraman for our local television station. I respect the work done by the people who doggedly pursue a story, check their facts, and continue digging.

Exhibition Notes for “Media Nodes,” by Sean Hemmerle
The “Media Nodes” series, which I began in 2002, was born from my desire to photograph the news media as it was and as it was changing. I wanted to photograph the nodes of production in order to visually articulate the activities and environments of “the media”.  At that time it was apparent to me that the news media was in transition. The few bloggers in operation were largely independent and not taken seriously. Magazines with previously stellar reputations for investigative news were sliding toward jingoism, celebrity, and financial instability. Fox News was overtaking CNN in the Neilsen ratings, and Ted Coppel’s numbers were slipping on Nightline. At that moment, it seemed that hard-core, investigative journalism as we had known it was in peril. Fox News

I considered each newsroom as a node of production, choosing to photograph them architecturally, industrially, and using long exposures. This approach illustrated the proxemics of each location via traffic flow and spatial arrangements. Without a caption or explanation, viewers can glean the functionality of these spaces through elements such as the placement and type of furniture, levels of lighting, and the divisions of volumes. Each person working in these offices has his or her own function, however, the organization portrayed (whether independent paper or media conglomerate) also has a unique mission, which becomes more discernable after studying its interior spaces. 


In 2002, I approached the Columbia Journalism Review, asking if they would collaborate on this project and they agreed. The first organization to say “yes” to our requests was the New York Post.  Next, having shot for Time, I next contacted colleagues there inquiring about whether I could photograph their facilities. All of the people I once knew there have since moved on. In the past decade, there has been unprecedented turnover and evolution of the “Fourth Estate”.  Journalism has been retooled and remains vital, but in new forums like Al Jazeera, Politico, Propublica, Democracy Now, and a myriad of independent bloggers. This leaner, more agile media is reporting on events happening every moment of every day.

 

I set out to photograph the news business much like Eugéne Atget photographed Paris at the dawn of the twentieth century to preserve it in a visual medium for future generations. While the monolithic Tiffany Network of Edward R. Murrow’s day has yielded to a multi-ethnic chorus of decentralized contributors, the decisions through which stories are prioritized and distributed is still a process practiced regularly in newsrooms across the nation. The character of the resulting news product varies from node to node, evolving into patterns of bias unique to each institution. Each newsroom’s physical space and its materials of construction indicate that organization’s personality. The eight-year project that is Media Nodes, consequently, becomes a view behind the curtain, beyond the front page, to the interior landscape of an industry in transition. The exact placement of each desk tells the story of that evolution.

Sean Hemmerle
August 2011


Categories
Art Galleries Underground Gallery

Traveling 'Purple Hearts' exhibit honors Iraq war veterans – Times Union article

“Purple Hearts,” a series of portraits by photojournalist Nina Berman, documents the return of 17 Army soldiers and Marines wounded in the Iraq war. “Youths tend to get wrong impression from video games, TV shows and movies that tend to romanticize and glorify combat,” said Bob Alft.

Sanctuary volunteer Bob Alft has made a personal commitment to get Nina Berman’s “Purple Hearts” photographs, exhibited at the Sanctuary in Fall ’09, to schools and community organizations across the region.

Congrats to Bob, for arranging to have an exhibit at a local high school, and for getting an article written in the Times Union!

Check out this article in the Times Union: ‘Purple Hearts’ exhibit honors Iraq war veterans

“It’s great to see this important work have a life in the Capital Region, beyond our gallery show.  These are powerful and moving images that reflect and create an important debate about the role of military in society and recruiters in our schools,” says Steve Pierce, Executive Director, Media Alliance at The Sanctuary for Independent Media.

Categories
Underground gallery shows

Scrappin' Upstate Art Exhibit

Scrappin’ Upstate, from the “Upstate Girls Documentary Project” 

Brenda Ann Kenneally and The Upstate Girls

Funding for this exhibit made possible through support by Open Society Documentary Photography Fund Audience Engagement Grant (formally called the Distribution Grant). 

In partnership with Rensselaer County Historical Society and Media Alliance; generous in-kind support of printing and copy work from Daniel Portnoy Photography.

An installation of large scale prints from Upstate Girls’ scrapbooks, alongside prints from the diaries kept by young women growing up in 1900’s Victorian Era Troy.

The personal becomes political, as this exhibition integrates stories of young women in North Troy today with those of their turn-of-the-century counterparts.

 

In a collaborative scrapbook project with “Upstate Girls,” the young women themselves created collages of their own family photos, official documents, writing, and drawing.

The Scrappin’ Upstate Project workshop began at “The Conversation with Upstate Girls” event at The Sanctuary for Independent Media on April 2, 2008, and continued at “Troy Night Out” later that spring.  The ongoing project has resulted in a dozen scrapbooks and has extended into a multi-media archive. Kenneally’s “Upstate Girls” photos often appear in the pages of the girls scrapbooks.

 

 

The young women and men who created these lived as extended family in homes directly on the block of the Sanctuary.  Their pages honor the milestones as the young women came of age, each with her individual challenges, yet all formed in some way by the character of the City of Troy itself.  These are the stories of descendents of the Industrial Revolution’s working class, now the inheritors of economically devastated streets in the shadow of “Tech Valley” today. 

 

Local historians claimed Troy as the prototype for the Industrialization of America, the home of Uncle Sam. In the late 1800’s, Troy was one of the richest cities in the U.S. Today, as the Upstate Girls give birth to a new generation, most households on their block receive public assistance, have family members in the prison system, and survive on hourly wages earned from service sector jobs.  Globalization had changed Troy’s physical and social landscape; resulting challenges foster a more punitive attitude in public policies.

 

Scrappin’ Upstate will be featured in an upcoming graphic novel, which will be used to facilitate workshops and an online site, designed to preserve the stories of contemporary young women as a significant part of the ongoing history of Troy.  Digital representations of the Upstate Girls’scrapbooks will join the Rensselaer County HistoricalSociety Archive.

MORE ABOUT UPSTATE GIRLS

 “Upstate Girls” share stories about the challenges in their lives, and the institutions with which they are entwined—including the legal, educational, healthcare and penal systems.  Award-winning photojournalist has photographed in North Troy for the past seven years.  She reflects, “The years that I documented The Upstate Girls have produced nuanced stories that are a mirror for young working class young people in America to realize their common strengths and identify moments where social change is possible.

Categories
Underground gallery shows

SPRING ’09 GALLERY EXHIBITION: Photo journalist Brenda Ann Kenneally’s "Upstate Girls: What Became of Collar City"

 


Check out more about Brenda Ann Kenneally’s “Upstate Girls”  at:  the Raw Files.

 

Prison photo

“Upstate Girls” is a look at a part of working class America that, despite sweeping technological advances, remains essentially unchanged since the heyday of the Industrial Revolution—an indictment of the by-products of globalization that shape the American visual and social landscape. The ongoing project aims deep into the emotional and psychological cycle of poverty from a women’s eye view.

The photographs are on display in the Underground Gallery at The Sanctuary for Independent Media, available for viewing an hour before, during and an hour after events and by arrangement. Visit www.therawfile.org for more of Brenda Ann Kenneally’s work.

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hot dog boy

Award-winning photographer Brenda Ann Kenneally is a mother and an independent journalist whose long-term projects are intimate portraits of social issues that intersect where the personal is political. She began reporting in 2004 on the lives of five teen girls from north Troy who would come of age in an industrial city in post-industrial America. She is working to push the boundaries of the social document, using the web as a tool to expand and contextualize her immersion style of reporting. Her many awards include the W. Eugene Smith Award for Humanistic Photography, a Soros Criminal Justice Fellowship, the Mother Jones Documentary Photography Award, the International Prize for Photojournalism, a Nikon Sabbatical Grant, the National Press Photographers Association’s Best of Photojournalism award, and the Cannon Female Photojournalism Grant. Born in Albany, she now lives in Brooklyn.

—–

Categories
Underground gallery shows

Fall '09 Gallery Exhibition: Photo journalist Nina Berman "Evidence and Fantasy: Militarism in American Life"

  Photo journalist Nina Berman “Evidence and Fantasy: Militarism in American Life”

with photographs from “Purple Hearts,” “Marine Wedding,” and “Homeland”


 

Spc. Adam Zaremba image Photo by Nina Berman, from "Purple Hearts"

Nina Berman is a documentary photographer with a primary interest in the American political and social landscape.

Internationally known for her photographs of wounded American military, Nina Berman‘s exhibit “Evidence and Fantasy: Militarism in American Life” includes work from her series “Purple Hearts,portraits and interviews with wounded veterans, “Marine Wedding,” and “Homeland,” a look at militarism, religion and security in post 9-11 America.

Check out the NY Times articles on Marine Wedding and Purple Hearts.

Photo by Nina Berman, "Red Carpet" from "Purple Hearts"

 

 

 

 

Her work has been extensively published, exhibited and collected, garnering praise in both the art and journalism worlds. She has received a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, awards from the World Press Photo Foundation, and a grant from the Open Society Institute Documentary Photography Fund. She is a member of NOOR, a worldwide photo collective.  She is on the faculty of the International Center of Photography and lives in her hometown, New York City.

Our Sanctuary audience met the artist on Veterans Day, 2009, when Nina Berman came to the Sanctuary to discuss her work and share a multi-media presentation. For more information about this event, check out our Nov. 11 event, Veterans Day Reflections on the Casualties of War.

“I don’t believe in the notion of the objective photographer, that somehow a photo is balanced and you’re dispassionate.” “I don’t think that would have value. That’s like a security camera.”

 

 

 

 

 

Spc. Robert Acosta, By Nina Berman, from "Purple Hearts" For more information, go to http://www.ninaberman.com All rights reserved. Please do not redistribute! “ That doesn’t mean I have an agenda. But I do have areas of interest.”

Stealth Bomber, Atlantic City, N.J., 2007.  By Nina Berman, from "Homeland" For more information, go to http://www.ninaberman.com All rights reserved. Please do not redistribute!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nina Berman in The War’s Long Shadows- Lens Blog-NYTimes.com

Categories
Underground gallery shows

Fall '07 Underground Gallery: Woodstock Women In Black

 

WOMEN IN  BLACK

An international movement of women for peace

                                                      

You are welcome to join us at our vigil on the Woodstock Village Green every Sunday from 1:00 to 2:00 pm.  Men are welcome to stand in solidarity with us.


 

Women in Black in Woodstock has been standing on the Village Green with other peace groups weekly since June 2001. 

We wear black as a symbol of mourning for ALL the victims of war and violence.

We are silent because words cannot express the tragedy that war and hatred brings.

            Today we stand in mourning for the more than 100,000 innocent Iraqis killed in this war, the over 3097 Americans and 394 international soldiers who have lost their lives, the 47,657 American wounded,  and the 625,000+ innocent men, women and children who have been maimed and injured.  When will it end?

         This was a preventable war, a war of choice.  The reason always given by the White House was to destroy Saddam Hussein’s Weapons of Mass Destruction.   Not one Iraqi WMD has been found!  It is now clear that Iraq was never any threat to us or its neighbors.

We stand against all pre-emptive wars that make our whole world a more dangerous and lawless place.

We believe that the $350+ billion spent on this war and its aftermath could have been better spent at home, saving our educational system and restoring the deep cuts to it, strengthening healthcare so 44 million Americans are not without it, shoring up our faltering economy and creating jobs for the record numbers unemployed.

We stand for peaceful resolution of conflict. We need to rely on the rule of law, supported by the international community and enforced by the UN Security Council and a strong International Criminal Court.  The use of force is barbaric, antiquated and leads to catastrophic human suffering and damage to the environment.

Democracy is wonderful, but it can never be imposed on people.  We now see how difficult and complex the situation is in Iraq; however deciding on an Iraqi government is not the province of the U.S.   Brent Scowcroft, National Security Advisor to the first Pres. Bush, said, “What is going to happen the first time we hold an election in Iraq and the radicals win?  We’re surely not going to let them take over.”  Then and now, the US was involved in antidemocratic, often violent operations in Iraq in ’63, ’74, the ‘80’s and 12 years of sanctions in the ‘90s that have seriously hurt the civilian population.

 We also stand in opposition to human rights abuses, the erosion of our civil liberties, profiling and discrimination based on ethnicity or religion, a bloated budget for death and destruction, and intolerance and oppression in all its forms.

Women in Black (WIB) began in June 1988 when Israeli women courageously stood on the streets in Jerusalem to protest the occupation of Palestine, and in solidarity with the women in Palestine.  Today, WIB vigils are springing up in cities and towns across the US, and around the world.  Each group is independent, and sets its own agenda.  In Italy, WIB stand for justice for immigrants and for international peace.  In Serbia, Bosnia and Croatia, WIB set an inspiring example of interethnic cooperation during wartime, and in Germany, WIB protest neo-Nazism and nuclear weapons.

  What unites all Women In Black groups is a

passion for peace and justice for all the people of the world.

 

For more info, contact: [email protected]

WHAT  YOU  CAN  DO 

TO  WORK  FOR  PEACE

Stay informed: make it your business to seek out alternative sources for news.

Write letters to the editor.

Plan and participate in vigils and demonstrations.  (Come stand with us!)

Voice your opinion on talk radio.

Give financial support to and/or volunteer for representatives who oppose war.  Tell your representatives today that you support the formation of a Dept. of Peace.

Speak up!  Express your views, your concerns and your questions.

 

SOME RESOURCES

NEWS

Alternative Radio   www.alternativeradio.org  and WAMC 90.3 Tues. 1-2 pm

Common Dreams News Center   www.commondreams.org

             Democracy Now  www.democracynow.org  and Woodstock Public Access TV, Channel 23 Mon.-Fri., 10-11 am

Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting   www.fair.org

Friends Committee on National Legislation   www.fcnl.org

Pacifica Radio  www.pacifica.org

The Nation   www.thenation.com

The Guardian Weekly   www.guardian.co.uk

Truthout   www.truthout.org

Waking Planet   www.wakingplanet.com

Z Net   www.zmag.org

 

ACTION

American Friends Service Committee   www.afsc.org

Families for Peaceful Tomorrows    www.peacefultomorrows.org

International Action Center   www.iacenter.org

Media Workers Against War   www.mwaw.org

Move On   www.moveon.org

Not in Our Name    www.nion.us

Oxfam America   www.oxfamamerica.org

United for Peace and Justice   www.unitedforpeace.org

Voice for Change   www.voice4change.org

 

WRITE TO:

Pres. George Bush    [email protected]

Sen. Hillary Clinton    [email protected]

Rep. Maurice D. Hinchey     www.house.gov/hinchey

Sen. Charles Schumer   [email protected]

 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Woodstock Times    [email protected]

Daily Freeman    [email protected]

Poughkeepsie Journal   [email protected]

 

      A different  and  better  world  is  possible and  you  can  help  create  it!

WOODSTOCK  WOMEN  IN  BLACK

[email protected]

      

      PEACE WOMEN

Code Pink   www.codepink4peace.org

Gather the Women   www.gatherthewomen.org

Women in Black   www.womeninblack.org    www.womeninblack.net

Women’s Action for New Directions   www.wand.org

Women’s Human Rights Network   www.whrnet.org

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom 

    www.wilpf.org, www.wilpf.int.ch/, www.peacewomen.org

Women Waging Peace   www.womenwagingpeace.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories
Underground gallery shows

Fall Season 2008 Underground Art Gallery Installation • Don't Forget Us: Iraqi Children 2001- 2008

Fall Season 2008 Underground Art Gallery Installation • Don’t Forget Us: Iraqi Children 2001- 2008

◦ The Iraqi Children’s Art Exchange invites Iraqi and American children and youth to participtate in art-inspired projects. Transcending the barriers of language, culture, and politics, these projectes create important learning opportunities. These projects also help foster communication between countries at war, and promote peace and non-violence. The Iraqi Children’s Art Exchange is based in Northampton Massachusetts. This project was organized by Claudia Lefko, director of the Iraqi Children’s Art Exchange, co-sponsored by Women Against War, Bethlehem Neighbors for Peace, and the United States Committee for Regugees and Immigrants Albany Field Office.

Categories
Underground gallery shows

"Evidence and Fantasy: Militarism in American Life" by photo journalist Nina Berman

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OUR FALL ’09 GALLERY EXHIBITION!!! 

Photo journalist Nina Berman

“Evidence and Fantasy: Militarism in American Life”

with photographs from “Purple Hearts,” “Marine Wedding,” and “Homeland”

pc. Adam Zaremba image

Photo by Nina Berman, from “Purple Hearts”

  

Nina Berman is a documentary photographer with a primary interest in the American political and social landscape.

Internationally known for her photographs of wounded American military, Nina Berman‘s exhibit “Evidence and Fantasy: Militarism in American Life” includes work from her series “Purple Hearts,” portraits and interviews with wounded veterans, “Marine Wedding,” and “Homeland,” a look at militarism, religion and security in post 9-11 America.

Check out the NY Times articles on Marine Wedding and Purple Hearts.

 

    

Photo by Nina Berman, “Red Carpet” from “Purple Hearts”

Her work has been extensively published, exhibited and collected, garnering praise in both the art and journalism worlds. She has received a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, awards from the World Press Photo Foundation, and a grant from the Open Society Institute Documentary Photography Fund. She is a member of NOOR, a worldwide photo collective.  She is on the faculty of the International Center of Photography and lives in her hometown, New York City.
 
  

Meet the artist on Veterans Day, when Nina Berman comes to the Sanctuary to discuss her work and share a multi-media presentation. For more information about this event, check out our Nov. 11 event, Veterans Day Reflections on the Casualties of War.

 

 

“I don’t believe in the notion of the objective photographer,

that somehow a photo is balanced and you’re dispassionate.”

 

 

 

 

“I don’t think that would have value.

That’s like a security camera.”

 

 

pc. Robert Acosta, By Nina Berman, from "Purple Hearts" For more information, go to http://www.ninaberman.com All rights reserved. Please do not redistribute!

 

 

 

    

tealth Bomber, Atlantic City, N.J., 2007.  By Nina Berman, from "Homeland" For more information, go to http://www.ninaberman.com All rights reserved. Please do not redistribute!

   

 

 

“ That doesn’t mean

I have an agenda. 

 

But I do have areas of interest.”     

 

 

 

 

                               Nina Berman in The War’s Long Shadows- Lens Blog-NYTimes.com

—-

We bring innovative media and visual artists to the Capital Region of New York State, and are dedicated to presenting artists whom mainstream media and art venues often neglect.  We especially seek artists who push their art to create new languages and expressive forms; we feature works with an aesthetic and conceptual edge that challenge the viewers to look at the world anew.

Categories
Art Galleries Underground gallery shows

Peter Kuper and Miles paint "Pissed-Off Peace Dove" at the Sanctuary!

SanctuaryPissedOffPeaceDove PeterMiles

Wow, the Sanctuary has a new and amazing mural! 

Peter Kuper’s “Pissed Off Peace Dove,” painted by artists Peter Kuper and Miles (seen immediately at completion, in front of our new dove.)

Now we have WW3 energy 365 days of the year…

and a perfect mascot watching over all of the Sanctuary folks hanging in the cafe.

Thanks, Peter, Miles,

and all of the wonderful WW3 artists who visited this weekend!

 

Categories
Art Galleries Underground Gallery

Seth Tobocman: Why Keep Publishing "World War 3 Illustrated"?

Seth Tobocman, a renowned artist and activist and founding member of the World War 3 Illustrated collective, sent us these thoughtful words about why the collective is still creating and publishing its magazine.

Why is this political comic book, which started in 1980, still publishing?

The oil slick off the gulf coast, the collapse of a speculative housing bubble, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Hurricane Katrina, the bombing and siege of Gaza, the massive anti-globalization protests in Seattle and other cities, the election of America’s first Black president. All of this proves us right.

We started this magazine in 1980 because we believed that Ronald Reagan was taking this country in the wrong direction. We believed that a new, radical movement would emerge to challenge these right wing policies.This was not a popular position at the time and even many who agreed with us cautioned us that it was unwise to be so bold and upfront about our politics.

Today, material conditions are driving politics. The Wall Street meltdown proves that “supply side” economic theories were false. The evidence of global warming and other ecological problems is all around us. The ongoing conflict in the Middle East demonstrates the failure of American foreign policy.

We also started this magazine because we believed that comic books were an important artistic medium with an untapped potential to energize American and World culture. At the time, book publishers had never heard of “graphic novels” and comic book companies were still gearing their products to appeal exclusively to adolescent males. So the current popularity of graphic novels, along with the many motion pictures based on comics and the emergence of web comics, all of this proves us right as well.

And that’s why we are still publishing this comic book as well as expanding into digital media and performance. Come celebrate the 30th anniversary of this visionary project!

Please join us Saturday, May 8 at 8pm in celebrating the past 30 years of work by the World War 3 Illustrated collective! Full event information is at https://archive.mediasanctuary.org/event/world-war-3-illustrated-30th-anniversary.